*****THIS VIDEO IS GRAPHIC AND MAY NOT BE SUITABLE FOR YOUNGER VIEWERS’*****

As we lay down here in the county this evening we should all be thankful the storm spared us.  Yes some people had wind damage to their property but it could have been worse. As you will see in the video I am going to post not less than 15 air miles from us they were not so lucky.  I had the privilege under dire circumstances today to film on a horse farm owned by Bill and Rhonda McCardle on highway 25 in Crittenden, them or their neighbors was not that fortunate.  As you will see in the beginning of the video the dump truck on its side was believed to have come from the interstate, a half a mile away, killing the driver, it came across their farm which sets along I-75.  Their neighbors who lived in front of them and helped on their horse farm, was found dead beside a horse in their home covered by debris and straw. A gentleman, who had spoken to his wife shortly before the storm, said she stopped by Kroger’s to pick up a few things and was on her way home.  When they found the car earlier today it was across the fence on their farm, along the interstate, part of her body was approximately 350 yards from the home of the McCardles, she was wearing her seat belt and the winds had torn her in half. In a matter of a few minutes the McCardles’ along with many other people lost everything they owned and some paid the ultimate price of the storm.  This video is graphic but here at GCVideoNews we want to try to get people to understand how dangerous storms can be and how fast they can hit and destroy lives.   We are being told they believe it to have been a F-3 tornado that went through this area, they also believe there was 7 to touch down.

I WAS ASK THIS EVENING BY THE McCARDLES IF I WOULD REMOVE THE VIDEO, IT WAS TO HURTFUL TO SEE, SO OUT OF RESPECT FOR MRS. RHONDA McCARDLE, WHOM WHAT LITTLE I WAS AROUND HER, SEEMED TO BE A FINE PERSON I HAVE TAKEN THE VIDEO DOWN.

KHC Offers Disaster Relief to Horse Owners Affected by Recent Tornadoes

Lexington, KY, March 5, 2012 – The Kentucky Horse Council (KHC) is providing coordination for the U.S. Equine Disaster Relief Fund to support horse owners affected by this past week’s tornadoes. KHC has experience responding to equine crises through this fund and the Save Our Horses (SoHo) Fund.

“In the past, we have supported many victims of flooding and disasters in other states, and now it is Kentucky which needs this support.  Our hearts and prayers go out to all who have been affected by this tragedy. The U.S. Equine Disaster Relief Fund will help Kentucky horse owners with temporary feed and fencing as they work to recover from this disaster,” remarked Anna Zinkhon, President of the Kentucky Horse Council. “We are also in touch with the Indiana Horse Council to determine the extent of the need there,” she continued. The Kentucky Horse Council has been contacting officials in those areas most affected by the tornadoes, to assess the impact of the extensive tornado damage on horse owners. “We are relieved that over the weekend, horse organizations such as the Northern Kentucky Horse Network have already relayed important information among horse owners regarding temporary shelter and how to assist those victims who have horses. Buffalo Mounted Patrol has traveled to West Liberty, where the devastation was incredible, to patrol damaged areas until rescue efforts could be fully mobilized,” commented Ginny Grulke, Executive Director of the Kentucky Horse Council. When any state needs assistance due to a natural disaster, KHC notifies its members and the Kentucky horse community and begins the process of responding to the needs of the affected horses, typically by purchasing feed which the local response agencies then distributes to affected horses. For the tornadoes that hit this past weekend, it is Kentucky who needs the help. Donations to the U.S. Disaster Relief Fund can be made at www.kentuckyhorse.org/disaster-relief/ABOUT THE KENTUCKY HORSE COUNCIL – The Kentucky Horse Council is a non-profit organization dedicated, through education and leadership, to the protection and development of the Kentucky equine community. The Kentucky Horse Council provides educational programs and information, scholarships, personal liability insurance, trail riding advocacy, horse show support, and an annual statewide equine industry directory. The specialty Kentucky Horse Council license plate, featuring a foal lying in the grass, provides the primary source of revenue for KHC programs.